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The first photo below shows the 4-acre parcel of land Horatio owned in Indian Village Township northeast of Montour, Iowa and today is north of US Highway 30 on F Ave.  Coming from farm county in Iowa, I would say that this land is not good crop land and the person who owns it now apparently agrees.  He seems to be raising hogs.  This land is hilly with shallow ravines.  It does have a good water supply, however, and so maybe Horatio, too, used it for raising livestock.  He buys this land on November 2, 1859.

This photo ▼shows one of the two eighty-acre parcels of land that Horation owned in Highland Township just south of Indian Village Township. The land here appears to be good cropland and it shows a healthy stand of soy beans on gently rolling hills.   Horatio and Lucina apparently buy this land early after they arrive in Iowa in March 1855 but sells it on Dec 31, 1856 for the sum of $200.00.  This land purchase makes him one of the first white settlers in Highland Township.  This is not a bad price for this time in history.  The other 80-acre parcel is about 1 mile to the northwest of this land but both are about 6 miles from the town of Butlerville.  I can't imagine that it was convenient to "farm" this land from Butlerville and haul farming equipment back and forth that distance.  I would be willing to bet that Horatio again ran cattle or livestock and used both places for pasture land.  I am going to take a long shot here and guess that Horatio is in the business of selling goods and livestock to the many wagon trains that pass very close to where they live.  People who travel in wagon trains need supplies and foodstuffs frequently.  It's later that we find out that Horatio and his boys all become involved with freighting supplies from the east to western settlements along the Oregon and Mormon trails whether they be Mormons or gold miners.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

This photo shows one of the two eighty-acre parcels of land that Horatio owned in Highland Township just south of Indian Village Township. The land here appears to be good cropland and it shows a healthy stand of soy beans on gently rolling hills.   Horatio and Lucina apparently buy this land early after they arrive in Iowa in March 1855 but sells it on Dec 31, 1856 for the sum of $200.00.  This land purchase makes him one of the first white settlers in Highland Township.  This is not a bad price for this time in history.  The other 80-acre parcel is about 1 mile to the northwest of this land but both are about 6 miles from the town of Butlerville.  I can't imagine that it was convenient to "farm" this land from Butlerville and haul farming equipment back and forth that distance. I would be willing to bet that Horatio again ran cattle or livestock and used both places for pasture land.  I am going to take a long shot here and guess that Horatio is in the business of selling goods and livestock to the many wagon trains that pass very close to where they live.  People who travel in wagon trains need supplies and foodstuffs frequently.  It's later that we find out that Horatio and his boys all become involved with freighting supplies from the east to western settlements along the Oregon and Mormon trails whether they be Mormons or gold miners.  

I have no photo of the last piece of land that we know belonged at one time to Horatio and Lucina.  They may have owned more.  We also have no buy and sell dates on this property.  New information 4/18/2008.  I have received documents from the Tama Count Historical Museum showing that Horatio bought this 80 acres when he a resident in the town of Buffalo in Ogle County, Illinois on July 16, 1855 for $100.   Does this mean that Horatio and his family resided for a short time in Illinois before moving to Tama County.  Did Horatio scout out this land or did he send his son, Joseph, ahead of the rest of the family to do so?  Did he buy it sight unseen?  We can only guess.  My Aunt Fan wrote that Joseph was an apprentice shoemaker Illinois at one time ?  This occupation seems to run in the family for generations and skills as a shoemaker become a fallback for male family members when quick cash was needed. Joseph remains a good shoemaker when he finally retires in Oto, Iowa and lives near to his son William (known commonly as "Billie" or "Willie").

 

We know that the first two parcels of land shown above are very near or even within the Mesquakie Indian Settlement in Tama County.  The Mesquakie Indians were formerly called the Sac (or Sauk) and Fox Indian tribes.  Perhaps Lucina felt more at home among them, especially at a time when feelings ran high against Indians during the "Indian Wars" when white Americans were eager to obtain the lands occupied by Indians and the Indians, meanwhile, were stubbornly resisting.

Below using just a portion of a modern Tama County map, I have shown where all of Horatio's "known" properties existed.  As you can see, Horatio's 10 acres lies largely beneath the current location of US 30.  Butlerville was located just about where the Iowa T47 sign is south of US 30 on the map.  By the way, T47 and E49 today meeting in Montour where at one time the route of old US Highway 30 which generally followed an East/West wagon trail traveled by thousands of pioneers going across Iowa from Clinton to Omaha in the 1800s.  Also, their location near Montour was only about 17 miles northwest of another well traveled 1800 East/West wagon trail which ran through Malcom, Iowa  today now located on Interstate 80 between Davenport, IA to Council Bluffs/Omaha. Is the name of this town just a coincident or something "closer to home". More later on this subject.